Branston helps to get to the root of youth unemployment

Posted: 26 September 2012
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Branston Ltd provided free skills training and showcased some of the exciting jobs available within the food industry as part of Feeding Britain’s Future - Skills for Work Week, which aims to help Britain’s unemployed youth into jobs.

Branston’s Lincolnshire site ran two half day learning sessions, in conjunction with Jobcentre Plus, during Skills for Work Week between 17 and 21 September.

The food and grocery industry employs one in seven people across the country and is taking an active role tackling youth unemployment. Feeding Britain’s Future was designed by leading businesses in the sector and developed by the IGD (the food and grocery industry’s research body). It brings together employers across the food industry and helps them to engage with young people - to give them training in the skills they need to secure jobs as well as promoting the employment opportunities available.

Branston joined a host of other leading food and grocery employers across the country, including Pepsi Co, Nestle and United Biscuits, who also took part in this initiative to tackle the growing problem of unemployment amongst 16 - 24 year olds.

Branston hosted two half day sessions to explain what the company does, give a tour of one of the factories and talk about job opportunities, whilst giving guidance on what they look for as an employer. The team also hosted sessions on soft skills such as CV writing and interview techniques, and gave the youngsters an opportunity to take part in a taste panel.

Simon Telfer, HR & logistics director at Branston said: “At Branston, we believe it’s really important to nurture young talent in the region and we have a ‘grow your own’ ethos for developing skills. The issue of unemployment amongst 16 - 24 year olds is one that affects our local community and as a large employer we want to help tackle the problem.

“We hope that through these seminars, we’ve shown local young people the great opportunities available within the food industry, which they otherwise may not have considered.”

Joanne Denney-Finch, chief executive of IGD, said: “The food and grocery industry is the UK’s biggest employer and we’re committed to playing our part in tackling youth unemployment. We consulted young people to find out what skills they feel they lack when applying for jobs – and Feeding Britain’s Future is about meeting those needs. We hope to have delivered a programme of really useful activity that will help them on their journey towards finding work.”